Klinkhoff’s October sale includes exceptional paintings by Emily Carr, Maurice Cullen, Sam Borenstein, Lilias Newton

Indian Village, Alert Bay, 1912, arguably the most important watercolour by the iconic artist Emily Carr.

"Indian Village, Alert Bay", 1912, arguably the most important watercolour by the iconic artist Emily Carr.

Galerie Walter Klinkhoff is pleased to celebrate the fall season with a presentation of excellent acquisitions made recently. Most of these are freshly available for sale, with a couple, specifically the Clarence Gagnon and the Lilias Torrance Newton, already sold but included here to give them the exposure they richly deserve. At the risk of taking a bit of luster off any number of fine paintings we are offering we do not think that we are overstating the significance of the Emily Carr “Indian Village, Alert Bay” of 1912 as arguably her most important watercolour, with the corresponding oil painting painted from it, virtually a replica of her watercolour, illustrated on the dust jacket of her first edition of Klee Wyck in 1941 and countless times in and on other Emily Carr publications since.

The selection of Borensteins is outstanding, the Coburn, a richly painted and most attractive composition by him, and the Cosgrove, a classic sous-bois. Any serious collector looking to acquire a classic and crisply painted North River Cullen should not hesitate over this one long. While the Des Clayes is a splendid composition by Berthe, the Jacksons are vibrant compositions of a vital generation of his career. Lawley, my Latin teacher in high school, was exhibiting at Dominion Gallery in my student days. He used to tease both Eric and me about that in class. Because he was a full-time teacher, except for Christmas holidays and the summer school recess he found his painting place to be Montreal, seeking out his beloved horses on Mount Royal or sometimes in front of the Roddick Gates at McGill. John Little has been consistently passionate about the soul of Montreal and Quebec City urbanscapes, more often than not in the winter season. The John Lyman and J.E.H. Macdonald, coincidentally are similar in sizes, and are jewel-like compositions. (Maybe someone should buy them as a pair!) It is difficult to overstate the shrewd opportunities to purchase fine paintings by Goodridge Roberts these days. We offer a couple of excellent paintings by him. For some, Percy Woodcock will be a discovery. We have been pasting together various notes previously written about him in significant scholarly Canadian art anthologies, inclusions which should emphasize to today’s collectors less familiar with the name Woodcock’s stature among his peers. In appreciation of the generation when he was active, the aesthetic quality of these paintings which compare favorably to Woodcocks in major Canadian museums, I am inclined to say that these represent important purchase opportunities. Hang these beside paintings of the same vintage by Clarence Gagnon and Suzor-Coté, paintings costing significantly more, these Woodcocks hold their space with distinction in that elite grouping.

We continue to be of the opinion that private treaty sales, that is transactions out of the auction environment, are in the greatest interest of most vendors. This is not a uniquely Canadian phenomenon right now and has been an increasingly large part of the marketplace within the last twelve months. One of the largest international art auction firms itself has reported a huge increase in private treaty sales they are even doing themselves for the benefit of sellers. We invite you to contact us for a private consultation to sell your fine works of art, confidentially, efficiently, respectfully, and to your financial interest.

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