Featured Painting: Lawren Harris, Spring in the Outskirts, 1922

Featured Painting: Lawren Harris, Spring in the Outskirts, 1922

In 1918, while recovering from his recent nervous breakdown, Lawren Harris began to focus on a new architectural subject: recently constructed houses in Toronto’s unplanned, blue-collar suburbs. Located just outside city limits, these unregulated settlements were widely known as “shacktowns.” In 1920, one art critic described the artist as the “first man in Canada . . . to glorify shacks.” A favorite suburban area for Harris was Earlscourt, a rural neighbourhood that had been under incremental development since 1906.

Beware vendors of art without expertise

Beware vendors of art without expertise

Beware of vendors who offer works of art without the current expertise and use only old labels of reputable galleries to support authenticity.

Straight Talk; Commissions and the Financial Efficiency of Alan Klinkhoff Gallery

Straight Talk; Commissions and the Financial Efficiency of Alan Klinkhoff Gallery

Would you give your property he sells for a total invoice of $5,000,000 to someone who is earning a commission of 20% or more (auction) if you recognized a trustworthy option for the same total sale value and the total commission is 8% ( = private treaty sale with Alan Klinkhoff Gallery) ?

FINE ART & HOCKEY: A Point of View

FINE ART & HOCKEY: A Point of View

The sport of hockey has affected innumerable athletes, fans, families and communities around the world. Inspired by our own histories as fine art dealers and amateur hockey players, Alan Klinkhoff Gallery will host a non-selling exhibition of fine Canadian paintings featuring hockey, a celebration concurrent with the 2016 World Cup of Hockey in Toronto, and the 100th season of the National Hockey League.

Powerful Psychological Paintings by Philip Surrey

Powerful Psychological Paintings by Philip Surrey

Rarely have we had such a varied selection of works of art available by Philip Surrey. While many, most, are small in size, looking at them as a group allows for a greater appreciation and sense of the importance of artist than seeing them individually here and there.

Arthur Lismer and Georgian Bay

Arthur Lismer and Georgian Bay

In the first half of the twentieth century, Arthur Lismer was a peer among an esteemed group of artists who were defining a distinctive nationalistic style of painting inspired by the wilderness of Northern Canada. For Lismer, the North presented an irresistible atmosphere that promised happiness and vitality, Georgian Bay being an especially compelling site for its sense of natural harmony and its proximity to his Toronto residence.

René Richard: Tom Thomson of the North

René Richard: Tom Thomson of the North

  “He knows what he wants to do and his love for the wilds will make another Tom Thomson of him.  […] There is not a Canadian artist, dead or living, who has drawn or can draw in 5 minutes sketches to compare with those of Richard,”  wrote Clarence Gagnon from Paris on March 14 […]

Classic Canadian Imagery Depicted in Rare 19th Century Watercolour

Classic Canadian Imagery Depicted in Rare 19th Century Watercolour

Montmorency Falls has long been a popular year-round destination for Quebecers and tourists alike, each searching for an inspiring spot for contemplation, activities and revelry. In winter, the spray and mist at the foot of the waterfall create a 30-foot high mountain of ice and snow over the rapids, commonly referred to as the “Ice Cone”.

Our Toronto Gallery is Now Open at 113 Yorkville Avenue

Our Toronto Gallery is Now Open at 113 Yorkville Avenue

Some 65 years ago my now late father Walter Klinkhoff began trading in works of art.  He subsequently established Walter Klinkhoff Gallery, ultimately moving to Sherbrooke Street West in Montreal’s Golden Square Mile, only a few blocks from where Galerie Alan Klinkhoff, Montreal, is now located.  With casual assistance in the gallery literally “since the […]

Spectacular painting by Paul-Émile Borduas is key in following the evolution of the artist’s œuvre

Spectacular painting by Paul-Émile Borduas is key in following the evolution of the artist’s œuvre

By François-Marc Gagnon, O.C., Ph.D. Joyeuses Facettes and a few other paintings are mentioned for the first time in a dispatch notice dated December 31, 1958 by Borduas to the Gallery owner G. Blair Laing, then situated at 140 Bloor Street West in Toronto. L.8 Joyeuses Facettes 30” x 40” L.4 Invasion 32” x 43” […]